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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
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Home > Images Dated > 2002

Images Dated 2002

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 105 pictures in our Images Dated 2002 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Michael Collins 1890-1922) Irish Nationalist, Sinn Fein leader, founder and director Featured 2002 Print

Michael Collins 1890-1922) Irish Nationalist, Sinn Fein leader, founder and director

Michael Collins 1890-1922) Irish Nationalist, Sinn Fein leader, founder and director of intelligence of the Irish Republican Army 1919, minister for finance in the provisional government of the Irish Free State 1922, and for ten days Head of State before being killed. Born in County Cork, he became an active member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood and in 1916 fought in the Easter Rising. In 1918 he was elected a Sinn Fein member to the Dail, and became a minister in the Republican Provisional government. In 1921 he and Arthur Griffith were mainly responsible for the treaty that established the Irish Free State. During the ensuing civil war, Collins took command and crushed the opposition in Dublin and the large towns within a few weeks. When Griffiths died Collins became head of the state and the army, but he was ambushed near Cork by fellow Irishmen on 22nd August and killed. Topfoto stills library picture library stock archive vintage Ireland Irish Rebellion 1916

© TopFoto.co.uk

Irish Easter Rising 1916 - one of the banners up on the GPO by rebels - The Easter Rebellion Featured 2002 Print

Irish Easter Rising 1916 - one of the banners up on the GPO by rebels - The Easter Rebellion

Irish Easter Rising 1916 - one of the banners up on the GPO by rebels - The Easter Rebellion, was an armed uprising of Irish nationalists against the rule of Great Britain in Ireland. The uprising occurred on Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, and centred mainly in Dublin. The chief objectives were the attainment of political freedom and the establishment of an Irish republic. Centuries of discontent, marked by numerous rebellions, preceded the uprising. The new crisis began to develop in September 1914, following the outbreak of World War I, when the British government suspended the recently enacted Home Rule Bill, which guaranteed a measure of political autonomy to Ireland. Suspension of the bill stimulated the growth of the Citizen Army, an illegal force of Dublin citizens organised by the labour leader Jim Larkin (died 1948) and the socialist James Connolly (1870-1916); of the Irish Volunteers, a national defence body; and of the extremist Sinn F?in. The uprising was planned by leaders of these organisations, among whom were the British consular agent Sir Roger David Casement, the educator Padhraic Pearse (1879-1916), and the poet Thomas MacDonagh (1878-1916).Hostilities began about noon on April 24, when about 2000 men led by Pearse seized control of the Dublin post office and other strategic points within the city. Shortly after these initial successes, the leaders of the rebellion proclaimed the Independence of Ireland and announced the establishment of a provisional government of the Irish Republic. Additional positions were occupied by the rebels during the night, and by the morning of April 25 they controlled a considerable part of Dublin. The counteroffensive by British forces began on Tuesday with the arrival of reinforcements. Martial law was proclaimed throughout Ireland. Bitter street fighting developed in Dublin, during which the strengthened British forces steadily dislodged the Irish from their positions...... Topfoto stills library picture library sto

© TopFoto.co.uk

This shield is taken from a MS of the twelfth century, in the Royal Library at Paris Featured 2002 Print

This shield is taken from a MS of the twelfth century, in the Royal Library at Paris

This shield is taken from a MS of the twelfth century, in the Royal Library at Paris; and is of that narrow kite-like form which prevailed from the time of the Norman conquest till at least the reign of Henry II of England. The form of the shield then underwent a gradual change very similar to that experienced by the gothic window at a later period; the bow became wider and wider, and the arch flatter, until at last it took the form which is still given to it in coats of arms

© TopFoto.co.uk