sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 
Home > Golden Age of Trains

Golden Age of Trains

Choose from 385 pictures in our Golden Age of Trains collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Golden Age of Trains Print

Crewe Station started service on 4 July 1837 with the opening of the Grand Junction Railway

Crewe Station started service on 4 July 1837 with the opening of the Grand Junction Railway. The purpose of this railway was to link the four largest cities of England by joining the existing Liverpool and Manchester Railway with the projected London and Birmingham railway. The line, which was the first long-distance railway in the world, ran from Curzon Street railway station in Birmingham to Dallam in Warrington, Cheshire, where it made an end-on junction with the Warrington and Newton Railway, a branch of the L&M.
At the time of opening Crewe only had 70 residents.

© TopFoto.co.uk

Featured Golden Age of Trains Print

Crewe Station started service on 4 July 1837 with the opening of the Grand Junction Railway

Crewe Station started service on 4 July 1837 with the opening of the Grand Junction Railway. The purpose of this railway was to link the four largest cities of England by joining the existing Liverpool and Manchester Railway with the projected London and Birmingham railway. The line, which was the first long-distance railway in the world, ran from Curzon Street railway station in Birmingham to Dallam in Warrington, Cheshire, where it made an end-on junction with the Warrington and Newton Railway, a branch of the L&M.
At the time of opening Crewe only had 70 residents.

© TopFoto.co.uk

Featured Golden Age of Trains Print

The Rocket - this locomotive was built by George Stevenson at Newcastle-on-Tyne in

The Rocket - this locomotive was built by George Stevenson at Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1829 to compete for a prize of ?500 offered by the directors of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway Company for the best locomotive which could at that time be produced. Five locomotives by different makers were entered for the competition which was won by the Rocket after what, in those days, were considered very exhaustive and severe tests. The Rocket weighed four and a half tons
?TopFoto

© TopFoto.co.uk